Houston, the Allergy Season has Arrived

Last Spring was one of the worst allergy seasons in Houston.  The longer cold weather delayed many trees from blooming which meant an unusually high number of trees were blooming at the same time. The unusually lengthy cold season this year makes it look like this allergy season could be just as bad, if not worse, than last year. The Snoring Center in Houston has successfully treated thousands of allergy sufferers, making it possible to get a good night’s sleep despite excessive nasal congestion that comes with allergy season. What is the connection between snoring and allergies?

Pollen causes congestion, making it difficult to breathe and leaving you with raw, scratchy nasal passages. Nasal congestion can make it impossible to get a good night’s rest. Fighting through your sleep, constantly moving from side-to-side to find an open nostril does not lead to a good night’s rest.

If you are a snorer to begin with, the last thing you need is increased nasal obstruction caused by allergies. To combat this kind of troublesome nasal congestion, The Snoring Center’s treatment center in Houston offers office-based Coblation Turbinate Reduction.  This simple, painless 20-minute procedure shrinks some of the soft tissue inside the nose is highly effective in providing years of relief from nasal congestion, pressure, and drainage.

Of course, allergies aren’t the only cause of snoring.  The Snoring Center utilizes the latest minimally invasive procedures to treat other causes of snoring.  Our list of treatments includes:

Our trained medical professionals can diagnose, consult and treat snoring problems in one day and usually in less than an hour. If allergies are keeping you awake or if you have any kind of snoring problem, stop The Sleeping Center’s Houston office for a consultation.

Your Doctor: Craig Schwimmer, MD, MPH, FACS, The Snoring Center’s Founder and Medical Director

Dr. Schwimmer is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist (Head and Neck Surgeon). A 1991 graduate of the Emory University School of Medicine, he completed his otolaryngology training at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, studying under some of the leading clinicians and scientists in the field of snoring and sleep apnea. He has co-authored numerous articles on the subject, including pioneering work on the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux.

After six years of residency training, he practiced in Baltimore, Maryland, where he was also a member of the teaching faculty at Johns Hopkins University and actively involved in training otolaryngology residents. Since 2001, he has practiced in Dallas, where he founded The Snoring Center.

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